Category: Uncategorized

Court Records and Proceedings: What is Public and Why?

Attorneys, journalists, professors, and other professionals will often cite court records and proceedings
in their line of work. Most court records are deemed public record, allowing almost anyone to access the
information by request. Transcripts of depositions and court testimony can often be obtained through
the court system or by purchasing copies owned by court reporters. However, there are some
exceptions on what can be made public and what cannot.

Federal Regulations Regarding Court Records

The right to obtain court records is protected under the Freedom of Information Act of 1966, signed into
law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. This law gives citizens the right to access most federal agency
documents, including court records, with a few exceptions. Some information pertaining to national
security, law enforcement protocols, and trade secrets may be labeled confidential and not considered
available to the public.

While the laws can vary on what information is available from state agencies, most follow the federal
guidelines on what information from courts and other agencies is deemed public. The exceptions are
also followed. In most cases, the following information is protected and not made public, even when
revealed in court proceedings and records:

  • Mental health records
  • Juvenile court records and proceedings
  • Drug and alcohol treatment and court records
  • Social security numbers, bank account numbers, and certain other financial information
  • Domestic violence proceedings
  • Paternity and adoption court records

These records are kept confidential to protect those involved in these cases. Records may be sealed or
off-limits, except to members of the agency involved.

Court Reporter Transcripts

Unless they contain confidential information protected by state or federal laws, most court reporter
transcripts can be obtained by the public. This can be a lucrative extra source of income for court
reporters if they sell copies to attorneys, journalists, and other interested parties.
Court reporters who wish to earn extra income by selling copies of their legal transcripts can join Expert
Depos for free. Check out our court reporter tour on our website to learn more.

Tips for Newly Licensed Court Reporters

Entering the specialized service of court reporting can be exciting and nerve-racking. Even with
extensive training and preparation, there will be situations that may be confusing for newly licensed
court reporters. It can help to know some of the common issues other court reporters have
encountered and overcome. Here are some tips that can make the transition into the real world of court
reporting easier.

Planning and Preparation are Key

Everyone, regardless of their tenure or position, has to go through a first day on the job and learn the
nuances of their profession. The same is true for every court reporter. To make it easier, be prepared
and plan ahead for those first days and assignments. Research the court or law firm you will be working
at; know the lawyer, deponents, judges, other names, and research the location. Plan to be early to
avoid feeling rushed.

Common Court Reporting Errors

Attention to detail is important for all court reporters. However, there are a few details that are
commonly missed by those beginning their careers. Plus, court reporters will find that unlike their
training, court and depositions can vary greatly depending on where they are held, and the other
professionals involved. Here are a few common errors made by court reporters you’ll want to avoid:

  • Possessive grammar. Court reporters need to be grammar experts, but possessive punctuation
    can be tricky. Remember that “it” does not use an apostrophe for possessive; only “it is” is
    written as the conjunction “it’s.”
  • Use Ms. Women, married or single, should be referred to as “Ms.”, unless specifically referred
    to as “Mrs.”
  • Certificate page date. When the court reporter signs the certificate page, the date should be the
    date the page is signed, not the date of the assignment.
  • Attorney tables. While it is common for plaintiffs to sit on the left and defendants on the right in
    the courtroom, this is not always the case. Assign the left or right tables based on where the
    attorneys sit—never assume the seating is standard.

There is so much to learn as a new court reporter, but with experience will come confidence and
improvement of skills. Another tip for new court reporters – there also comes an opportunity to add income
by selling transcript copies on Expert Depos. Check out the site to learn how to join for free.

Meta: As a new court reporter, there are bound to be some errors made. Use these tips to avoid
common mistakes and improve your skills as a court reporter as you gain experience.

Elements of a Great Legal Tech Conference

Legal professionals flock to legal tech conference events every year, seeking ways to improve themselves and their careers. While conferences provide an unparalleled level of access to networking opportunities, education on upcoming advancements, and industry buzz; all legal tech conferences simply aren’t created equal. There are those which will always stand above the rest, and most of those standout conferences have a few things in common.

The best and most effective conferences will provide attendees with a variety of benefits, so it’s important for content planners and organizers to offer more than just a high-profile keynote speaker. Here are a few elements shared, at least to some degree, by many of the best legal tech conferences.

Inspiration and Innovation

Legal professionals are certainly looking for things they can put into practice right away, but they also want to know what they should be looking out for months or even years down the road. For this reason, legal tech conferences should feature a good balance between practical measures, which can inspire immediate improvement and the innovation of the near future. Attendees should leave with a clear vision of not only the ways they can apply what they’ve learned in the present but also an idea of developments coming down the pipeline they should keep an eye on as they advance.

Speaking of inspiration; keynote speakers are, well, key. It’s easy to shoot for a recognizable name, whether or not they’re actually legal tech insiders, but it’s not always best. Great legal tech conferences may have keynote speakers with minimal experience in the industry itself, but the message they deliver should always be relevant and inspiring. Speakers should always be the kind of people legal professionals want or need to hear from in order to grow and develop professionally, in one way or another.

Amenities and Accommodations at Legal Tech Conferences

Enormous convention halls offer space for plenty of programming and exhibitions, but they can also affect everything from the flow of the schedule to the attendees’ ability to network.

A tightly-packed programming schedule in a sprawling convention center means attendees are always rushing from one spot to the next, with little downtime to eat, network, or take a deep breath. Great conferences will offer enough programming to keep everyone busy, but not so tightly scheduled no one has time to discuss ideas and network. The best conferences also offer a bit more in the way of healthy meal options, access to quality-of-life conveniences, and space to work together.

What are some aspects of tech conferences you’ve loved in the past? Share your best conference experiences in the comments.

Trends that are Currently Shaping the Legal Industry

There’s no doubt that the face of the legal industry is changing, thanks in no small part to the always-connected global network. Rapid-pace advancements in technology are driving change across most industries, and the legal profession is simply no exception. As law firms work to integrate new technology, while also managing the dramatic age gaps introduced by four separate generations working alongside one another, new approaches to old problems are beginning to take shape.

Social Media and the Legal Profession

When it comes to tech driving change in the legal industry, few things have the power of social media. It’s not just the place where firms promote their services, reach out to potential clients, and work to woo new talent. Social networking sites have the power to discredit witnesses, bolster strong cases, and provide discoverable evidence under amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

Another effect of the ability to network beyond borders through social media is an uptick in globalization efforts throughout the industry. Firms are collaborating with peers in other countries and taking a truly international approach to law, but they’re also changing the way they do things at home.

The proliferation of powerful devices and tailored online services today allow more flexibility than ever before. From allowing professionals to telecommute, to the establishment of truly virtual law firms. This best-of-both-worlds approach allows professionals to establish a work/life balance while still serving clients and employers effectively.

Outsourcing and Specialized Web Services

From databases designed to help locate and utilize depositions at lightning speed, to pure outsourcing via external contractors, tech innovation is pushing more firms to evaluate how they staff, where they spend money, and how to create greater flexibility with existing tools and services.

It’s not all about cost, either. Outsourcing some tasks is another way of building the all-important work/life balance necessary for productivity. Tools and services exist today which allow a single professional to manage what would have required dozens of man-hours in generations past.

From streamlining operations to saving money and creating a more hospitable work environment, tech trends are driving the legal profession in a new direction. What would you like to see next? Let us know in the comments.

How to Pick the Right Court Reporter Training Program

Whether you’re exploring your career options for the first time or looking for a change, court reporting is a stable, fulfilling career with earning potential in the 6-figure range.

But the first step to beginning this incredible career is learning the skills needed to become proficient in the industry. These include a strong command of the English language, the ability to meet tight deadlines, effective communication skills, and so much more.

Quickly and effectively building the requisite skill set means finding the right court reporter school to fit your needs.

Here’s how to do it:

Look for Certification

The first thing to do is exercise caution. When you begin to explore your options, you may find plenty of places willing to offer you the world in exchange for tuition fees. Don’t take the hype at face value.

To avoid getting taken advantage of, ensure the schools you are interested in are certified. You can use this NCRA list to cross-reference your choices.

Think About What You Want Out of It

Picture yourself working in your ideal court reporting job. What are you doing?

Take this image of yourself and use it to reverse engineer what you should be doing in school.

Does it require a certification beyond Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR)? Do you need specialized knowledge such as medical or scientific terminology? What skills do you need to get the job you want? Will you need an associates degree or is certification enough?

Ask yourself as many questions as you can think of before you pick a course.

While continuing education is great, you don’t want to have to go back immediately after completing your training because you learn that you’re missing something required to land the job you really want.

Consider Your Limitations

If you have nothing but time and freedom at this point in your life, you may be able to easily pick whatever school offers the program most tailored to your career goals. But chances are that you have responsibilities that limit the time and/or place you can focus on your education.

You might have young children that make it impossible to move to another state for school or a day job you need to keep to pay for tuition. Whatever it is, the best school for you is the one that can work with your constraints.

Luckily, there are plenty of schools that offer night courses, partial online courses, or that operate completely online.

If you visit the NCRA link we provided above, all of the programs are clearly labeled so you can quickly find the schools with time slots that work best.

Understand the Structure of the Course

Everyone learns differently. You may be the type of person who works best alone, or you may prefer individual guidance, or you might enjoy the structure of a traditional classroom environment.

No matter your learning style, research schools to find one with a structure that matches it as closely as possible. For example, you may think that you’d do fine taking courses online. But there are a number of ways schools offer online learning.

Some schools will provide a webinar style video and a message board to ask questions while others offer a live, immersive experience with tons of opportunities to interact.

Given the option, which would you choose?

Look for student reviews of the program you’re interested in and learn as much as you can about the actual structure of the classes before you make your final decision.

If you’re currently looking for a court reporter school, we’d love to hear from you and answer any questions you have.

Let’s take this conversation to Twitter!

You can tweet us @expertdepos and/or use the hashtag #expertdepostech

What do Court Reporters Need from Attorneys Before a Trial or Hearing?

Court reporters are highly trained professionals who, like attorneys, prepare for a new trial or hearing well in advance. In order to use their stenograph at the required 225 wpm to accurately transcribe the proceedings, court reporters build custom shorthand dictionaries with names and information specific to the case.

To accurately build a complete steno dictionary and create abbreviations for subject matter unique to the case, including names and key phrases, they need attorneys to submit the following:

  1. Joint Exhibits and Witness List – Generally standard forms with the case number, name, court clerk, department, type of hearing; and for the exhibits, the ID, number, date received, and description of each. The witness list includes the name, title, and address of each person an attorney intends to call, as well as a brief summary of the witness’ testimony.
  2. Job Dictionary from the Depositions – The court reporter(s) who reported the witness depositions will have done a lot of the legwork already. Referencing their dictionaries will help the trial court reporter speed up his or her preparations.
  3. Case Citation List – Providing a list of past court case decisions that are relevant to the current case will enable the court reporter to reference them quickly and efficiently at trial.
  4. Points and Authorities – The memorandum referencing important legal points that are discussed in the case, and the authorities that are relied on, is a key document the court reporter uses to prepare abbreviations for trial.
  5. Motions in Limine – Knowing what evidence may be excluded from trial, and evidence that will need to be discussed, enables the court reporter to have a well-rounded dictionary.
  6. Trial Briefs – Gaining access to the facts, evidence, and legal arguments the attorney intends to present enables the court reporter to develop key abbreviations for both names and ideas.

To further aid the court reporter in their preparation, it his helpful to submit as many documents as possible, particularly the Points of Authority, Motions in Limine, and Trial Briefs, in searchable PDF format.

A court reporter is a key ally at trial. Submitting all of the above documents by the required deadline will enable the court reporter to develop a complete case-specific steno dictionary, which is imperative for them to provide clean, real-time transcripts.

Attorneys Caroline Song Lloyd and Alex Borchert to Speak at National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) Convention

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Attorneys Caroline Song Lloyd and Alex Borchert to Speak at National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) Convention & Expo in New Orleans, LA

NEW ORLEANS – Caroline Song Lloyd, General Counsel/Partner at Expert Depos, and Alex Borchert, Customer Relationship Manager for RealLegal, a Thomson Reuters company, have been been invited to speak at the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) Convention and Expo, to be held August 2-5 at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans in Louisiana.

In a joint seminar, Ms. Song Lloyd and Mr. Borchert will discuss technologies that are emerging to change the practice of litigation, how it affects court reporters, and the need for new safety measures to protect their electronic work product. Specifically, Mr. Borchert will discuss how to safely adapt to the changing world of legal technology and the benefits of using electronic safety measures so court reporters can further protect against sharing of work product. Ms. Song Lloyd will discuss how court reporters can take advantage of changing legal technology by utilizing new revenue streams opening up in the court reporting industry. Specifically, Ms. Song Lloyd will discuss ways in which the court reporting industry can ethically take advantage of technology for new revenue in a manner that faithfully adheres to the rules and regulations that govern the court reporting industry.

In addition to her role at Expert Depos, Ms. Song Lloyd is practicing as a defense attorney in the greater Los Angeles area and continues to serve on the editorial board of Los Angeles Lawyer magazine, a publication of the Los Angeles County Bar Association (LACBA). Additionally, she is a member of the NCRA Committee on Professional Ethics (COPE).

Mr. Borchert is a licensed attorney with a background in Personal Injury and Immigration law. Prior to working with Thomson Reuters, he worked with a small Personal Injury firm while also giving his time with Legal Aid (non-profit affording professional legal help to those who traditionally lack funds and access to the American justice system).

The National Court Reporting Agency (NCRA), is the certification entity of the court reporting and captioning industry. The NCRA Convention is the largest annual gathering of court reporters, captioners, scopists, legal videographers, trial presenters, and other legal services professionals. ###

Pictured: Caroline Song Lloyd, Alex Borchert

CONTACT:
CAROLINE SONG LLOYD
(800) 970-4553
CAROLINE@EXPERTDEPOS.COM
HTTPS://WWW.EXPERTDEPOS.COM

What the Music Industry Can Teach us About the Future of Court Reporting

The music industry is dead.

Right?

Technology has killed it!

Some artists work incredibly hard learning to play instruments and perfecting their craft, but most of the time, the people getting the most attention have a MacBook and synthesized sounds. Or they coat everything in autotune to get by.

Not that it really matters. Not even the most popular DJ can make money when record sales are dwindling due to rampant piracy. Who’s going to pay for music when they can get it for free from so many sources?

If this type of fear resonates with you in your career, it shouldn’t. The music industry is doing just fine, and despite some people claiming that court reporting is dying, it’s doing just fine too.

We’ve already debunked the technology takeover of court reporting here and here, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t changes to be aware of or that you shouldn’t be thinking of alternative ways to make money from your hard work.

The way the music industry has adapted over the last several years can teach court reporters a lot.

Work With Changes in Tech, Not Against Them

Record sales used to be the gold standard to measure how an album performs. And there was a time when a big artist could go multi-platinum in the first few weeks or even days of releasing something new.
Times have changed.

Almost no one buys physical CDs and few people want to spend the same price on a digital product, especially when they can buy one song for a few cents on iTunes or stream the whole CD for free.

But major recording artists and their managers are still millionaires…at least the ones who have learned to adapt to the changing landscape. Anyone still trying to figure out how to make CD sales go back up isn’t doing so well.

It’s the same with court reporters. Of course, the job doesn’t look like it did 20 years ago; the world is changing at lightning speed and the court reporters who are still making good money are the ones learning to change with it.

Even though you don’t have to worry about tech replacing you, you do have to worry about becoming a relic. New technologies can simplify your daily tasks and provide better optics to the people looking to hire you.

In an interview with Lifehacker, Cassandra Caldarella answered, “I stay current on all technology. I have the latest software, hardware, tech gadgets, and gizmos,” in response to a question about how she makes her job easier.

Beware of Pirates

There’s no way around it: hundreds of sites make pirated music available to the masses. While trying to take them all down is like playing an unwinnable game of whack-a-mole, taking out a few of the most egregious offenders can help stem the tides and show that labels are willing to act.

Similarly, keeping an eye out for listservs that provide illegal copies of your depositions can help you keep the money you deserve for your work in your pocket.

Simply ask these sources to remove your property. Since they likely also work in the legal field, they probably know it’s in their best interest to do so when you request it.

Additionally, depositions are not meant to be public record. Maintaining control over them will help you protect the privacy of the individuals you’ve worked with.

Offer the Best Service

Sure, there are a lot of people illegally downloading music from the internet. Probably most people. But there are also a lot of people with paid, monthly memberships to services like Spotify.

Why?

Because in addition to providing virus-free music, Spotify offers a service that people enjoy.

They have a massive online music library that you can access from anywhere, you can download music when you don’t want to stream, and you can create your own playlists to share online or listen to hundreds of pre-made playlists.

Essentially, the extra benefits make it more convenient to pay for music than to steal it.

As a court reporter, you own your depositions. And ensuring they remain profitable after the initial creation means that accessing them through you has to be the most convenient option. Luckily, the internet makes this easier than ever.

Help attorneys find you and the depositions they need by creating a solid online presence. It will help to also explicitly state what you can offer. And of course, you can take advantage of the Expert Depos platform to simplify the process even further.

The added benefit of having the proper certification requirements to be able to use the deposition in court to help them win a case will outweigh the temptation to get the deposition from other sources.

And you get to decide what you want to charge for your new and improved service!

We hope this has made you think about how you can keep adapting to changes in your job and even use those changes to your financial advantage.

If you have any stories about the changes you’ve made, please let us know.

Let’s take this conversation to Twitter!

You can tweet us @expertdepos and/or use the hashtag #expertdepostech

The Court Reporter Pay Scale: What Affects Earning Potential?

Court reporting is a stable profession that allows qualified members to earn a good wage. But with so many variables influencing the pay scale, it can be difficult for court reporters to determine if they’re being paid what they’re worth.

According to the Bureau of Labor statistics, in 2012, the median salary for a court reporter was $48,160. At the same time, the bottom 10 percent of earners were making $24,790 or less and the top 10 percent of earners were making $90,530 or more.

This is a massive difference.

So what places you on this broad spectrum and how can you get to the top?

Type of Employment

If you stick to working in the legal profession, there are two primary types of employment: official court reporter and freelance court reporter (you can also work in captioning, but that is beyond the scope of this article).

Official Court Reporters

Official court reporters work in the same place day to day and are generally provided with the tools and software needed to do their work. They are paid on salary, but are also paid a page rate for the transcripts they produce (both salary and transcript fees are set for you by your employer).

The highest paid official positions are in the federal court. You can expect to make from $64,278 up to $73,920, depending on your experience.

Freelance Court Reporters

Freelance court reporters can set their own fees and hours, and they tend to work in different physical spaces day to day depending on the jobs they book.

While freelancers set their own rates, they usually work within a standard. For example, deposition appearance fees for jobs under four hours generally range from $50 to $75. For a full day, the fee is usually $100 to $150. And for other proceedings like arbitrations, court hearings, board meetings, etc., you can charge much more.

Freelance court reporters also need to consider the costs of running their own business. While official court reporters have everything provided, freelancers need to purchase all of the software and equipment they need to work. The startup cost is about $7000, but will vary greatly depending if you buy new, what brands you buy, etc.

Additionally, freelancers need to consider costs like self-employment tax, insurance, transportation, other office supplies, not getting compensated for time off, etc. However, the ability to control your fees and hours means you can still earn a good living as a freelance court reporter if you put in the work.

Location

Where you live will have a big impact on your earning potential as a court reporter. Relocation isn’t always possible, but if you’re in a position where you can move to create the career you want, there are a few things to keep in mind.

The first thing to consider is which states have the highest wages in your field. A 2011 study from the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that Oregon offers the highest wages for court reporters, with an average of  $85,670. New York, Maine, and Colorado are also high on this list.

The second consideration is the actual demand for court reporters in the region. There’s no point moving for high court reporter wages if the market is already flooded in the region. States with dense populations like California, Florida, and New York usually have consistently high demand.

The third consideration is the cost of living in the region you want to live. If a state or town has a particularly low cost of living, making $50,000 there could create a better quality of life than earning $60,000 somewhere else. For example, the cheapest city to live in in 2018 is McAllen, Texas, which is 23.9% below the US average cost of living.

Skills, Certifications, and Experience

What you bring to the table will have a large impact on your earning potential. Unfortunately, gaining experience will just take time, but there are other things you can do to show off your skills in the meantime.

Taking certification tests like Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR), Registered Professional Reporter (RPR), and Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR) will show your dedication and prove a certain level of proficiency.

Selling Transcripts

Court reporters own the work they produce, and every party who wishes to use that work must pay for each page they wish to access. The average ‘per page’ price for a transcript is $2.50 to $6.50, but it can be much higher for the top court reporters in the profession.

These fees add up quickly. As one Canadian court reporter noted in an interview with the Globe and Mail, “That’s where the real money is made. It’s in the transcript fees, not the hourly rate. She also stated that the top 5 court reporters in her agency make well over $100,000.

No matter where you stand on the pay scale today, there are ways to move yourself to the top. Be dedicated, learn everything you can, and make strategic decisions that prove your worth as a court reporter. Good luck!

Now we want to hear from you! Are you working on ways to improve your earning potential as a court reporter?

Let’s take this conversation to Twitter!

You can tweet us @expertdepos and/or use the hashtag #expertdepostech

Building Your Career in Court Reporting: What are the Options?

Most people entering the workforce today are preparing for an uphill battle. Between growing student debt and wages that have fallen 43% from the previous generation, many young people are giving up hope

But demand for court reporters remains high, with a starting salary to match.

Some cynics predict advancing technology will topple the industry. But like rumors of Mark Twain’s death in 1897, rumors of tech usurping court reporters are greatly exaggerated.

Producing a complete, accurate transcript is too important to risk by using temperamental tech, where a loud cough, a glitch, or forgetting to hit record could render it useless.

Unfortunately, not enough people know what a career in court reporting can offer, so employers are facing difficulty trying to find qualified candidates to fill empty positions. Though fortunately for new court reporters entering the field, this means there are few barriers between you and a fulfilling career.

Keep reading to explore the options available, complete with pros and cons.

 

Freelance Court Reporter

Freelancers are independent contractors who tend to work outside the courtroom, helping to cover depositions, arbitrations, meetings, business sessions, and more. This is where new court reporters usually start their career.

You have the option to work completely independently or as part of an agency. The agency is hired by law firms, lawyers, or a corporation and it assigns court reporters as needed.

Freelancers who work for an agency are typically on-call and can be given as little as one day of notice for a job. But it’s up to the freelancer whether or not they take it.

Because of the variety of assignments, freelance court reporters often get the opportunity to travel to different locations. Depending on the job, this could be local, national, and occasionally international travel.

Most freelance work is done from home after the initial record is taken, making it an ideal option for court reporters with kids or other home-based obligations.

Pros: maximum flexibility, job diversity, can complete most work from home.

Cons: short notice for work, usually no benefits.

Official Court Reporter

‘Official court reporter’ is a salaried position, working for United States district and magistrate judges. These are the court reporters who work directly in the courtroom recording trials.

According to the National Center for State Courts, these positions usually require four years of freelance work and can pay up to a six-figure salary with benefits.

These positions may also require various certifications, including Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR), Registered Professional Reporter (RPR), and Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR).

As an official court reporter, there are several opportunities for advancement. You can become senior reporters or look for jobs in higher courts.

The first step is attaining a position at the Superior Court. Positions in the District Court is the next step, and becoming a Senate Reporter in D.C. is considered the top of the field. But note, moving up in the industry requires finding ways to stand out.

Pros: stability, high pay

Cons: high pressure, few breaks

Captioner

Captioning is used to accommodate the hearing impaired by providing a text-based version of speech. It can be offered as an additional skill for a freelance court reporters or can be the focus of your career.

Getting hired for captioning positions usually requires certifications like Certified Realtime Reporter (CRC) and Certified Broadcast Captioner (CBC).

There are two primary types of captioning work: open captioning (real-time) and closed captioning (done in advance).

Both types may require expensive equipment that goes beyond what is required in a courtroom, deposition, etc., but court reporters who are drawn to this type of work enjoy that most gigs allow you to work completely from home.

Pros: remote options available, flexible.

Cons: tends to be lower pay, often requires expensive equipment.

 

Whether you see yourself working at the senate one day or prefer the flexibility of freelance court reporting, the options available are numerous. Court reporting is an expanding profession with room for you to design exactly how you want to work. So pick up your steno with confidence, and start working your way to your ideal career.

Now, we want to hear from you! How long have you been a court reporter? How do you prefer to work?

Let’s take this conversation to Twitter!

You can tweet us @expertdepos and/or use the hashtag #expertdepostech